destroyed-and-abandoned:

Val-Jalbert Ghost Town - Quebec,Canada. The pulp mill closed in 1927 and with no source of income the whole town was abandoned. .

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Val-Jalbert Ghost Town - Quebec,Canada. The pulp mill closed in 1927 and with no source of income the whole town was abandoned. .

neurosciencestuff:

Existence of new neuron repair pathway discovered
Most of your neurons can’t be replaced.
Other parts of your body – such as skin and bone – can be replaced by the body growing new cells, but when you injure your neurons, you can’t just grow new ones; instead, the existing cells have to repair themselves.
In the case of axon injury, the neuron is able to repair or sometimes even fully regenerate its axon. But neurons have two sides – the axon (which sends signals to other cells) and the dendrite (which receives signals from other cells).
Melissa Rolls, an associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State and director of the Huck Institutes’ Center for Cellular Dynamics, has done extensive comparisons of axons and dendrites – culminating recently in a paper published in Cell Reports.
“We know that the axon side can repair itself,” says Rolls, “and we know a bunch of the molecular players. But we really didn’t know whether neurons have the same capacity to regenerate their dendrites, and so that’s what we set out to find in this study.”
“Our lab uses a Drosophila model system, where the dendrites are very accessible to manipulation,” she says, “so we decided that we would start by removing all the dendrites from the neurons to see if they could regenerate. We didn’t start with anything subtle, like taking off just a few dendrites. We said ‘Let’s just push the system to its maximum and see if this is even possible.’ And we were surprised because we found that not only is it possible, it’s actually much faster than axon regeneration: at least in the cells that we’re using, axon regeneration takes a day or two to initiate, while dendrite regeneration typically initiates within four to six hours and it works really well. All the cells where we removed the dendrites grew new dendrites – none of them died; so it’s clear that these cells have a way to both detect dendrite injury and initiate regrowth of the injured part.”
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Existence of new neuron repair pathway discovered

Most of your neurons can’t be replaced.

Other parts of your body – such as skin and bone – can be replaced by the body growing new cells, but when you injure your neurons, you can’t just grow new ones; instead, the existing cells have to repair themselves.

In the case of axon injury, the neuron is able to repair or sometimes even fully regenerate its axon. But neurons have two sides – the axon (which sends signals to other cells) and the dendrite (which receives signals from other cells).

Melissa Rolls, an associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State and director of the Huck Institutes’ Center for Cellular Dynamics, has done extensive comparisons of axons and dendrites – culminating recently in a paper published in Cell Reports.

“We know that the axon side can repair itself,” says Rolls, “and we know a bunch of the molecular players. But we really didn’t know whether neurons have the same capacity to regenerate their dendrites, and so that’s what we set out to find in this study.”

“Our lab uses a Drosophila model system, where the dendrites are very accessible to manipulation,” she says, “so we decided that we would start by removing all the dendrites from the neurons to see if they could regenerate. We didn’t start with anything subtle, like taking off just a few dendrites. We said ‘Let’s just push the system to its maximum and see if this is even possible.’ And we were surprised because we found that not only is it possible, it’s actually much faster than axon regeneration: at least in the cells that we’re using, axon regeneration takes a day or two to initiate, while dendrite regeneration typically initiates within four to six hours and it works really well. All the cells where we removed the dendrites grew new dendrites – none of them died; so it’s clear that these cells have a way to both detect dendrite injury and initiate regrowth of the injured part.”

Read more

Reblogged from Neuroscience
girlandguns:

Girl With Gun  follow me at : http://girlandguns.tumblr.com/

girlandguns:

Girl With Gun follow me at : http://girlandguns.tumblr.com/

Reblogged from Girls And Guns
coolsciencegifs:

 

biomorphosis:

The Gladiator Spider can make an expandable sticky web like a net. When an insect passes below it, it stretches out the net, lunges downwards and flings the net over the prey.

coolsciencegifs:

 

biomorphosis:

The Gladiator Spider can make an expandable sticky web like a net. When an insect passes below it, it stretches out the net, lunges downwards and flings the net over the prey.

Reblogged from COOL SCIENCE GIFS

lacarpa:

Floral + Anatomy

by

Ffo

Reblogged from ...but that's OK

santiagocaruso:

"Burnt Black Suns" by Santiago Caruso / Ink & scratch over plastered cardboard / 2014

Image & design of the cover of the book by Simon Strantzas, published by Hippocampus Press.

Reblogged from
weaponoutfitters:

Susan Coffey with a friend’s Colt Python.

weaponoutfitters:

Susan Coffey with a friend’s Colt Python.

Reblogged from Bag full of guns
knifepics:

by Strider

knifepics:

by Strider
Reblogged from Knife Pics
cockbarf:

"You could shake your knuckles at the sky. You could get mad and say I don’t got nothing. You could get stuck."
Hick (2009)

cockbarf:

"You could shake your knuckles at the sky. You could get mad and say I don’t got nothing. You could get stuck."

Hick (2009)

Reblogged from dead girls
bestqualitybeksinski:

Zdzisław Beksiński

bestqualitybeksinski:

Zdzisław Beksiński

Reblogged from HARDCORE JUDAS
wilburwhateley:

Le Phare des Casquets by Victor Hugo (1886)

wilburwhateley:

Le Phare des Casquets by Victor Hugo (1886)

Reblogged from HARDCORE JUDAS
Reblogged from HARDCORE JUDAS

gunrunnerhell:

Chiappa Rhino 20DS

A .357 Magnum revolver, it was designed by the same man responsible for the Mateba, an out of production firearm of similar appearance. The barrel is positioned lower to reduce muzzle flip, creating a very easily controlled pistol even when using heavy recoiling ammo. The sides of the cylinder are flat instead of a being round, making it more comfortable to keep holstered against your body when concealed. (GRH)

Reblogged from Bag full of guns
euo:

Kiss (unfinished) - 2014 - Oliver Fletcher

euo:

Kiss (unfinished) - 2014 - Oliver Fletcher

Reblogged from peach plum earth sun